A Guide: How I Read More Than Most Probably Do

Hello Everyone,

A lot of people on Twitter are asking how I managed to already read 100 books this year. Many of them can’t fathom how I’m reading a 1000 pages of a book in less than two weeks, while simultaneously managing other books. I’m going to go through and explain how I read so much and offer tips!

First: I don’t do gaming.

I know a lot of book bloggers game and I love Skyrim to pieces. But I really am not enthusiastic about most games. I do sometimes play chess online, and lately I like Stormfall (available on Google play) but otherwise I don’t game. I’m weird that way I know, but I read more than game.

Second: I quit watching TV.

Most tv annoys me lately. With how loud my family listens to it in being mostly deaf, I find tv supremely annoying. I prefer quiet and solitude, though all of us are avoiding Covid like the plague. So I can’t get solitude often. I’m sometimes watching TV shows on Disney Plus, Hulu, and Paramount. But that’s only for the shows that I’m currently on. I’m picky in what I want to watch. And lately, I’m perfectly fine without tv.

Third: Reading based on mood.

I barely have set tbrs. I used to but they began being a challenge in completing so now I just read what I want when I want. I splurge for a new release but only if it’s an author I absolutely adore i.e: Seanan McGuire, Stephen King, and a lot of others. I read, finish the book, pause, pick up another book. I try not to pause too long as to avoid a reading slump.

Fourth: I have no social life.

As I said earlier, I don’t get out much due to Covid. I’m have family that’s hugely at risk for death and I’m the same. I’m disabled and I have to keep my family in mind. We’ve barely gone anywhere. So it grants me more time to read at home.

Fifth: Reading keeps me sane

I know that probably sounds like I’m overreacting but reading is one of the few escapes that I have these days. I’m incapable of going anywhere but reading lets me pretend. I’m stuck where I am so I might as well read lol.

Sixth: I am a fast reader

I speed read. Sometimes I skim if it’s not keeping my interest but I read ridiculously fast. I’m also fast at typing, though texting is another matter lol.

Seven: I don’t punish myself if I don’t finish a book.

This is a trend I’ve seen about on Instagram and Twitter that I don’t understand. I’m never going to finish certain books and I don’t care to. Why are y’all wringing your hands and doing punishments? So what? If a book didn’t suit you then oh well. There’s other books waiting and I’m not going to read a book I’m not enjoying unless it’s school/work related. Please stop it with this trend!

Eight: I have unlimited resources through internet and library.

I have so many bookish apps. I test out new ones all the time. I use the Wayback Machine. I use my own library system. I sometimes buy books off Amazon. I read in every waking moment that I can, when not busy with real life. I’m always walking about with my phone that has the Kindle app installed so I can easily read books from there. I make it a practice in taking a physical book with me wherever I go. There’s all sorts of books and things you can read online or use your library. Support your local library!!!

Nine: I read to educate myself but also to have fun.

Don’t stress over books you have to read, but enjoy the to books you want read. It’s fun, but also pick up new genres to try. Read nonfiction. Learn new things. But just read for fun.

Ten: I also read to support authors

I write book reviews. At least I’m supposed to lol. But I like supporting authors and their works. I like helping others out, and I enjoy interacting with authors on Twitter and through email. It’s fun and it’s a big reason why I try to read as much as I can as often as I can. If I could get paid to read books, I’d love it. It would be the perfect job.

And that is it. I hope that this guide was super helpful and if you still have questions feel free to leave comments down below. Click the like button to boost this post because it really does help me out. Subscribe if you want to see more content from me.

Until next time,

-Pass Me That Book

A Guide To #OwnVoices: What Is It, What Books Go With It, and Why It’s Important

Hello Everyone,

Recently, I have noticed that no one ever did a blog post explaining what exactly #OwnVoices was. (If I’m wrong, please correct me in the comments and I will fix this!) came across the term about a year or two ago and researched it myself. I got a vague understanding of it. Yet though it’s increased in popularity there seems to be an alarming amount of publishers, bookstore owners, and random people that have no idea what #OwnVoices is, exactly. Let me explain.

#OwnVoices IS NOT BIOGRAPHIES!!!

)As stated on Google) #OwnVoices is a term that was coined by YA author, Corinne Duyvis. The term refers to books about characters from underrepresented/marginalized groups in which the author shares the same identity. The writing is inspired by the author’s own experiences and written from their own perspective.

The author Corrine Duyvis wrote one of my all time favorite YA sci-fi novels On the Edge of Gone back in 2016.

One of my top favorite covers. Just look how beautiful it is!

Her book was an #OwnVoices story, wherein both the Main Character and the Author is autistic. That is #OwnVoices, in the character being described by someone who HAS THE SAME THING!

Say I’m Bi. (Of which, I am, hello fellow bi people! 👋) I write a book and it has a bi main character. That is therefore, #OwnVoices. Simple, easy, and good.

But why is #OwnVoices important you ask? Because we need diversity! We need to have stories with positive representation! We need good stories that accurately show how lgbt lives are, or certain issues are in being important! It should be a more frequent content seen in books, but in a positive way.

What are some other books that have #OwnVoices?

I’m glad you asked! I have a handful of books here that each one have #OwnVoices in some form or another!

Why Are #OwnVoices books becoming more popular?

Well, because we like seeing positive representation of ourselves. It’s nice seeing another character that’s bi and not straight. Nothing wrong with straight people but we like seeing more and more acceptance for lgbt. Along with a lot of other amazing things that are being showcased more and more frequently too.

Has Corrine Duyvis written other books?

Yes she has. She has at least two other novels out (that I know of) and a few short stories. I love most all of her writing and I support her each chance I get. There hasn’t been anything super new that I’m aware of but again I hope I’m wrong on that.

If you have further questions or want to chat, feel free to comment below and I’m also on Twitter as Lovesteaandbook.

Until next time,

-Pass Me That Book

Top Five Places to Get Arcs: That AREN’T Netgalley or Edelweiss

Tired of scrounging the web for places that actually list interesting looking arcs that aren’t of just one genre that you don’t read? Don’t want to browse through Netgalley for the hundredth time searching for something to read? Then you’ve definitely come to the right post! Now a lot of these books aren’t as good as the bestsellers that would typically be on Netgalley or Edelweiss. So keep that in mind as you browse through these places.

Top 5 Places to Get ARCs:

*simply click the name of the place, and it should take you right to their website*

1. Book Sirens= a great place to request books, and they also have detailed graphics and charts of what kind of reader and how much of a reader you are. They also give you a helpful reading charts/status page on your profile that I find very cool.
2.Hidden Gems=an insane amount of romance novels are on here, but there’s also other genres that are available as well on occasion. This is a more ‘first come first served’ kind of thing tbh, you put in your request, but you don’t always get selected for the book you get, though I’ve had insanely good luck with most of my requests, though they send arcs through email as well.
3.Booksprout=yet another heavily romance genre arc place, but it also contains a good bit of fantasy, science fiction, and ya as well. I rarely frequent this place, but I definitely still check in at least twice a month to see what might be available from favorite authors..
4.Booksends=I literally just found this place, so I’m still testing it out. But it seems as though this is another one that you sign up by email, they send you links to arcs, and you select which ones you want. They provide mobi files for kindle, it appears, which is what I generally use anyway.
5.BookPerks=this isn’t an arc place, but it does send you some rather nice bestsellers and new releases that are generally discounted towards less than five dollars. Therefore, sorry I’m cheating with this one, but I felt it worth mentioning for those who are looking to save some cash.

If y’all could spread this list around, help share these sites so that others might be able to find it, that would be awesome. I get that there’s probably been a lot of these helpful recommendation lists for finding arcs, but almost every last one of them has recommended Netgalley and/or Edelweiss as the main place. This should be far more helpful than mentioning the same two old places that most people may already know about.

As such, I do hope y’all found this to be a helpful list. Let me know what you thought of it in the comments! And if any of the links don’t work, please don’t hesitate in letting me know! I’m slowly getting used to linking, lol.

Until next time,
-Pass Me That Book