Book Review: The Far Pavilions

Hello Everyone,

Not the best cover but not the worst!

Book Title: The Far Pavilions

Author: MM Kaye

Series: Book One of Two

Genre: Adult Fiction, Historical, Adventure, Romance

Publisher: St. Martins Press

Page Count: 1000

Goodreads Summary:

A magnificent romantic/historical/adventure novel set in India at the time of mutiny. The Far Pavilions is a story of 19th Century India, when the thin patina of English rule held down dangerously turbulent undercurrents. It is a story about and English man – Ashton Pelham-Martyn – brought up as a Hindu and his passionate, but dangerous love for an Indian princess. It’s a story of divided loyalties, of tender camaraderie, of greedy imperialism and of the clash between east and west. To the burning plains and snow-capped mountains of this great, humming continent, M.M. Kaye brings her quite exceptional gift of immediacy and meticulous historical accuracy, plus her insight into the human heart.

My Thoughts:

This book took me a solid week to read! Long winded, lots going on, a bit sexist here and there but those were the times, and I felt as though I would never finish reading this book. I learned there’s a part two. I’m not sure I’m going to read that, lol.

My Review:

This book was a struggle for me right from the start. While I was liking the adventure and the characters, it felt as though it went on and on and on. A 1000 pages of epic adventure, romance, and historical fiction at its best. While people adored Gone With The Wind this was the epic I wanted! The writing was lush, beautiful, and detailed.

I know a lot of newer book reviewers might not be enthusiastic about reading this 1000+ page time, but I’m insisting that it’s worth it! The ending is bittersweet, and the characters and setting will sweep you away. From India to England there’s something new to devour from each page.

The story starts with a premature baby being born in winter and the mother dying due to her not used to the fiercely cold winds. The story expands. It touches to n war. Cholera takes the baby-main character-father and uncle’s lives. More are lost. Travels are had.

This book does have it’s horribly sexist moments. While it’s a relic of the time it’s set in, there are certain things that are hugely sexist in the book. There’s dry spells here and there when it feels like nothing happened. And the ending was a slow burn that felt bittersweet; exactly as those on Google and Goodreads both have stated.

I feel as though this, while a hefty tome, is well worth the effort in reading. Especially if you’re a fan of Gone With The Wind and Outlander. This is equally as huge and well written as the pair.

My Rating:

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Until next time,

-Pass Me That Book

Library Book Review: The Case for Jamie

The Case for Jamie

 

Book Review: The Case for Jamie

Title: The Case for Jamie (Book 3)
Author:
Series: Book 3
Page Count: 349
Publisher: Katherine Tegan Books
Type of Book: Library Hardback
Genre: Mystery, Young Adult
Rated: 4/5 stars

The third book in the fabulous Charlotte Holmes is one of my favorite books of the year, and the series continues to grow with characters that make appearances and references to the first original Sherlock Holmes, in this case (see what I did there?) to the Reinchbach falls. I still favor Watson over Charlotte-while Charlotte grew on me through this book, I still liked Watson’s character rather more, for being more personable.

The two characters deal with the reappearance of Lucien Moriarity, who is up to his usual evil ways, though you admittedly don’t see a whole lot of that till the last half of the book. It’s the case of everyone plotting to make Jamie’s life miserable, and Jamie is utterly convinced that Lucien is behind everything, while everyone else is insisting Jamie is slowly growing crazy based upon the events of the last two books, well he knows that he has a new case on his hands. One where he hopes that Charlotte will come out of hiding and help him, despite his having a girlfriend named Emily.

I always found Emily to be a bit of a suspicious character, though I couldn’t place exactly why. I wasn’t surprised that she was (spoiler alert). Yeah, I’m not including spoilers, but I am pointing out how I felt about the characters.

Other than the characters of which I liked, the book felt to me that it dragged a bit through the middle, but at the end it was a resounding hit, meaning that I liked it enough to give it 4/5 stars. I definitely will continue with reading this series, as its loads of fun, though admittedly this book was a bit darker than the other two..

Overall, 4/5 stars for a job well done!

Now,
-Pass Me That Book

Indie Book Review: Don’t Look At Me

Don'tLookAtMe

Title: Don’t Look at Me
Author: J. P. Grider
Series:
Page Count: 340
Publisher: Fated Hearts
Type of Book: ARC Copy, Indie, Kindle Ebook
Rated: 5/5 stars

Don’t Look at Me is a retelling of Beauty and the Beast, where instead of the guy being the beast, it’s the girl who turns ugly. I thought that a unique perspective, and a refreshing one, because-as the author puts it-why can’t the girl be ugly and have the guy fall for her regardless?

The story tells the tale of a girl named Haven who fell in love with a bookshop at the age of nine and goes there every time she gets the chance since. As an adult, she frequently buys books there whenever she gets her paycheck and can afford to after paying rent and taxes and being an adult. She loves to read anything and everything.

Quest is a young man who is freshly back from being in the Army, where he was released due to a painful secret. After his grandfather passes, he is shocked to discover his grandfather left the books that were originally his-signed Earnest Hemingway first editions-to a girl that he’s never met before. Convinced she managed to somehow trick his grandfather into giving the books to her, their first meeting is less than ideal.

Fast forward a bit, and while arguing over books, and Haven trying to convince him to keep the bookstore going, she is attacked by the Slasher, a hooded guy going around and slashing women’s faces, and making the ugly. She is now stuck at home, with plenty of time to read, because of how ugly she is.

Vanity is one of the few things I never understood about people, so Haven’s choice of ignoring the world because she’s ugly-though people tell her she’s really not-really bothered me. To me it seemed a bit of an overreaction…you have a deep scar on your face, and that makes you instantly unattractive? Scars can be beautiful, but it took most of the book for Haven to realize this.

I also identified the Slasher right away, but I was surprised to find that it was also *SPOILER*. I really liked the bit of trickery that the author did there.

The ending of the book was a happy one, sweet and warm. I liked how there were little nods towards the original telling-the bookstore, the beast, the love between the main characters. It was a well written retelling of the original, and my hat goes off to the author!

Overall, I give the story 5/5 stars for a job very well done!

Now,
-Pass Me That Book.